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[As it appears in the 1995 reformatted print version]

Binder I: Piman Society to 1751
Chapter I: THE PLACE NAME TUBAC

Chapter II: ABORIGINAL PIMAN SOCIETY

Chapter III: DETERIORATION OF NORTHERN PIMAN SOCIETY FROM 1520 TO 1729
A. The Measles Epidemic of 1728-1729
  B. The Spanish "Epidemic Region"
  C. The Aboriginal "Epidemic Region"
  1. The Twilight of Indian Civilization
    a. Cultural Effects
    b. Biological Effects
  2. Epidemics in the Aboriginal Region
    a. Smallpox Epidemic of 1520
    b. Measles Epidemic of 1531
D. Epidemics of the Reduced Region
  1. Epidemic of 1545
  2. The Matlazahuatl Epidemic of 1576
  3. The Measles Epidemic of 1595-1596
E. Epidemics in the Enlarged Spanish Epidemic Region
  1. The Smallpox Epidemic of 1607-1608
  2. The Epidemic of 1641
  3. The Epidemic of 1646
  4. The Epidemic of 1662
  5. The Smallpox Epidemic of 1710
  6. The Smallpox Epidemic of 1724
F. Consequences

Chapter IV. CHRISTIAN CONVERSION
A. Tchoowaka becomes a Visita
  B. Forms of Indian on the Sonoran Frontier of New Spain
  C. The Tubaca Mission Farm
D. Spanish Style Native Government
E. Transculturation in Ritual
F. Prelude to Disaster
  1. Prelude Theme: Malaise Over Resource Loss
    a. Missions
    b. Ranches
    c. Mines
    d. Fort
  2. Prelude Theme: Resentment of Arbitrariness
    a. Governor Joseph's Flogging
    b. Lancing Prisoners--The Squash Squabble
    c. Durance Vile
  3. Prelude Theme: Psychology of Despair
    a. Infectious Epidemics in Mission Times
    b. Matlazahuatl Epidemic of 1736-1737
    c. The Epidemic of 1744
    d. The Epidemic of 1747
    e. The Epidemic of 1749
    f. The 1751 Smallpox Epidemic
    g. Population Decline    
  4. Prelude Theme: Spaniards Are Not Invincible

Binder I: Piman Society to 1751

CHAPTER V. THE PIMA REVOLT OF 1751
A. Tubac's Role in the Pima Revolt
  1. War Clubs in the Morning
  2. Second Thoughts
  3. On Active Service
  B. Tracks in the Dust
  C. The Spanish Camp at Tubac
   1. A Captain-General Surrenders
   2. Geopolitical Consequences of Luis's Surrender
D. Return of the Natives
A. A New Fort Is Suggested
B. A New Fort Is Authorized
C. Foundation of the Upper Pimeria Company
  1. Commandant
  2. Garrison
  3. Locating the Post
    a. Frontiersmen's Meeting
    b. Other Officers Agree
    c. The Missionaries Concur
  D. Foundation of the Royal Fort at Tubac
 

1. The Viceroy Approves
    a. Pay for Tubac
    b. Ten Men Maybe
    c. Two Posts for the Price of One
    d. Adobe Walls
    e. Royal Arms for Citizenry
    f. Viceregal Approval
  2. Primary Military Mission
    a. Developing Apache Pressure
    b. Fall From Grace
    c. Turn the Other Flank
E. Military Characteristics of the Royal Fort at Tubac
  1. Indian Chasing Calvary
    a. Apache Offensive in 1752
    b. Seri Offensive in 1757
    c. Seri Offensive in 1760
    d. Seri Offensive in 1761
    e. Apache Offensive of 1766
    f. Seri Campaign of 1766
    g. Elizondo Expedition
      i. 1768 Campaigns
      ii. 1769 Campaigns
     iii. 1770 Campaigns
     iv. Success!
    h. Apache Offensive in 1768
    i. Apache Offensive in 1769
    j. Apache Offensive in 1770
    k. Apache Offensive in 1771
    l. Apache Offensive of 1772
   m. Apache Offensive in 1773
   n. Summary
  2. Garrison Strength
    a. Recruitment
    b. Service Records
  3. Troop Payment
    a. Spoils
    b. Accounts
  4. Armament
    a. Lance
    b. Firearms
    c. Swords
    d. Militia Weapons
  5. Uniform
  6. Escort and Protection Mission
  7. Reports
  8. Inspections
F. Commanders of the Tubac Company. 1752-1776
  1. Merchant Prince
  2. Indian Agent
    a. The Natives Leave
    b. Mission Work
    c. Indian Prison
    d. The Gila River Pimas Rebel
    e. The Papagos Rebel
    f. Anza Talks Turkey
  3. Captain Juan Thomás de Beldarrain
  4. Captain Juan Bautista de Anza
  5. Lieutenant Juan María Oliva
G. Subalterns
  1. Lt. Simón Roxas de Thaboada
  2. Lt. Juan Christiano Ramirez
  3. Ensign Joachín de Usarraga
  4. Ensign Joseph de Huandurraga
  5. Ensign Juan Phelipe Beldarrain
  6. Non-Commissioned Officers
H. Religion at Tubac
  1. Church
  2. Jesuit Missionaries at Guebavi Mission
    a. Juan Nentvig
    b. Alonso Espinosa
    c. Francisco Pauer
    d. Miguel Gerstner
    e. Bernhard Middendorf
    f. Ignaz Pfefferkorn
    g. Custodio Ximeno
  3. Secular Clergy at Tubac
  4. Franciscan Missionaries at Guebavi-Tumacácori
    a. Juan Chrisostomo Gil de Bernabé
    b. Francisco Sanchez Zúñiga
    c. Juan Joseph Agorreta
    d. Bartholomé Ximeno
    e. Gaspar Francisco de Clemente
    f. Joseph Mathías Moreno
    g. Juan Gorgoll
    h. Thomas Eixarch
    i. Félix de Gamarra
    j. Francisco H. Garcés
    k. Pedro Antonio de Arriquibar   
  5. The Compadrazco System as a Transculturational Device
  6. Morality
I. Socio-Economic Characteristics of the Royal Fort at Tubac
  1. Secondary Military Mission
    a. Retirement
    b. Mining Interests
    c. Ranching Interests
    d. Costume
      i. Men
     ii. Woman
    e. Housing
    f. Furnishings
  2. The Structure of Society
    a. Caste
    b. Class
    c. Tubac Dominant Caste: The Provincial Elite
      i. The Provincial Upper Class
     ii. The Provincial Middle Class
    iii. The Provincial Lower Class
    d. Tubac Subordinate Caste
      i. Acculturated Independents
     ii. Acculturated Semi-Independents
    iii. Slaves
    iv. Mission Indians
     v. Allies
    e. Marriage
J. Health Conditions
  1. Recreation
  2. Diet
  3. Tobacco
  4. Population
   a. Birth
   b. Fertility
  5. Epidemics
   a. Epidemic of 1760
   b. Epidemic of 1765-1766
   c. The Measles Epidemic of 1770
K. Finding and Founding Upper California
  1. Anza Plans and Garcés Explores
  2. Anza Proposes
  3. The Viceroy Disposes
  4. Anza Finds the Pacific
  5. The Viceroy Redisposes
  6. Anza Colonizes the Bay
L. The Spanish Succession and Tubac


CHAPTER VII. FRONTIER PUEBLO
A. Unhappy Pioneers
  B. Agricultural Resources
  C. Range Resources
D. Social Relationships
E. The Solace of Religion
  1. Fray Pedro de Arriquibar
  2. Fray Balthasar Carrillo
F. Health Conditions
G. Tubac Gives Its All

Binder III: 1787-1857
CHAPTER VIII. THE ROYAL FORT OF ST. RAFAEL AT TUBAC
A. The New Apache Policy of Viceroy Galvez
  B. The Pima Company
 

C. The Pima Company at Tubac
  1. Opening the New Mexico Road Military
  2. Characteristics of the St. Rafael Company
    a. The Peaceful Apaches
    b. Garrison Strength
    c. Wall Fortification
    d. Armament
  3. Commanders of the St. Rafael Post, 1787-1821
    a. Lt. Pedro Sebastian de Villaescusa
    b. Lt. Nicolás de la Errán
    c. Ensign Manuel de Leon
    d. Lt. Simón Eliás Gonzalez
    e. Lt. Ygnacio Sotelo
    f. Lt. Ignacio Eliás Gonzalez
    g. Subalterns
      i. Ensign Agustín Marquez
     ii. Ensign Juan Martinez
    iii. Ensign Manuel Ortega
    iv. Ensign Juan B. Romero
D. Religion at St. Rafael at Tubac
 1. Hierarchical Visitations
    a. The Collegiate Visitor in 1795
    b. The Episcopal Visitor in 1796-1797
    c. The Presidential Visitor in 1797
    d. The Collegiate Visitor in 1814
    e. The Episcopal Inspection in 1820-1821
 2. The Interim Chaplaincy
    a. Fray Balthasar Carrillo
    b. Fray Florencio Ybañez
    c. Fray Ramón Lopez
    d. Fray Angel Alonso de Prado
    e. Fray Maríano Bordoy
    f. Fray Narciso Gutierrez
    g.Fray Manuel Saravia
    h.Fray Joseph Ignacio Ramirez
    i. Fray Gregorio Ruíz|
    j. Fray Juan Bautista Llorens
    k. Fray Juan Bautista Estelric
 3. The Compadrazco System at Fort St. Rafael
E. Social Characteristics of Fort St. Rafael
 1. Land Grants and Use Rights
    a. Canoa
    b. Sonoita
 2. The Anza Ranches
 3.The Tubac-Tumacácori Complex
    a. Economic Symbiosis
    b. Mining
 4. Tubac and Other Communities
 5. Marriage
 6. Morality
 7. Involuntary Servitude
 8.Education
    a. Catholic Instruction
    b. Public School
    c. Advocate
F. Health Conditions at Tubac
 1. The Smallpox Epidemic in 1799
 2. The Smallpox Epidemic of 1816
    a. San Lorenzo
    b. Magdalena
    c. Pitiquito
    d. Tumacácori
    e.Guebavi
    f. Calabasas
    g. Tubac
G. Conversion of the St. Rafael Company from Imperial to Republican Status
 1. Citizenship: A Revolutionary Concept
 2. Anglo-French Dynastic Rivalry
 3. A Two-Variable Interpretation of Modern European History
 4. The Technique of a Successful Revolution
    a. Alexo García Conde
    b. Maríano de Urrea
    c. Simón Eliás Gonzalez
    d. Antonio Narbona
    e. Tubac


CHAPTER IX. THE MEXICAN PRESIDIO AT TUBAC
A. The Period of Grace: 1821 to 1833
  1. Colonel Arvisu's Proposals
  2. The Colorado River Expedition of 1825
  3. Federal Frontier Fort Policy
  4. The Great Land Rush in the Santa Cruz Valley
  5.The Problems of Independence
    a. The Attrition of Officers
    b. The Problem of Succession
    c. The Problem of Finances
    d. The Problem of Ethnic Self-Determination
  6. Sonora Asks Federal Help
  7.Sonora Prohibits the Sale of Government Property
  B. Military Characteristics of the Tubac Garrison
  1. Authorized Pay Scale
  2. Decline in Strength
  3. Degeneration of Command
  4. Ruination of Structure
  5. Apache Saviors
  C. Civil Government at Tubac
  1. Special Legal Status
  2. Local Self Government
D. Economic Production at Tubac
  1. Horticulture
  2. Ranching
  3. Mining
  4. Hunting
E. Religion at the Mexican Town of Tubac
  1. Fray Ramón Liberos
  2. The Expulsion of Spaniards
  3. Post-Expulsion Religious System
  4. Mission Assets
  5. The Compadrazco System
F. (not listed)
G. Social Characteristics of the Mexican Town
  1. Marriage
  2. Morality
  3. Caste-Class Leveling
H. Health Conditions
  1. The Measles Epidemic in 1826
  2. Cholera in 1833
I. The Death of a Fort
J. Abandonment

CHAPTER X. THE MEXICAN MILITARY COLONY
A. Tubac Becomes a Military Colony
  B. Apache Reinforcements
  C. Apache Fighting
D. Emigrant Road Way-Station
E. Morality
F. Aftermath

APPENDIX I. ARCHITECTURE
A. The Mission Ranch
  B. Piman Rancheria
  C. The 1752-1776 Post
  1. The Wall
  2. Dwellings
  3. Captain's Quarters
  4. Church
  5. Corrals
  6. Field Fencing
  7. Irrigation Ditch
D. The 1787-1848 Post
  1. Wall
  2. Dwellings
  3. Church
E. The 1851-1854 Post

APPENDIX II. BRIEF CHRONOLOGY OF TUBAC

BIBLIOGRAPHY